WILDE PUBLICATIONS 2015

A new impression of their 2011 edition of De Profundis + The Ballad of Reading Gaol [as De profundis + Balada de la cárcel de Reading], translaion, introduction & notes by Arturo Agüero Herranz has been published by Alianza Editorial in Madrid, 2015.

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[Posted 19.xii.2015]

Jarlath Killeen: ‘The greening of Oscar Wilde: situating Ireland in the Wilde wars.’  Irish Studies Review 23 : 4, September 2015 pp.424-50

Abstract

The importance of Ireland to an understanding of Oscar Wilde has been the subject of contentious discussion in recent years. For one group of critics Wilde has been considered “a militant Irish republican”, an Irish “terrorist by another name”, whose literary practices resembled those of “guerrilla warfare”, an ardent Home Ruler and Parnellite, and committed Irish nationalist whose work is suffused with references to Ireland and the Irish Question, very influenced by his Irish background and political views, possibly shaped by a genuine interest in and awareness of Irish folklore and the Irish oral tradition, and deeply engaged with issues of Irish identity and culture. For an opposing set of critics Wilde should at best be considered a “reluctant” Irish patriot, who referenced his Irish “identity” only when it suited him commercially, was more interested in exploiting intellectual fashions and fads than making genuine political points, was a shallow thinker in most areas of life and certainly didn’t use his writing to pursue Irish nationalist issues, was probably more of a British imperialist than an Irish nationalist, knew precious little about Irish folklore or Irish oral traditions, and his works contain few if any references to Irish issues or themes. The differences between these two interpretive communities certainly seem quite large, and these differences have been emphasised in a disputatious manner which has shed more heat than light on the messy matter of Wilde’s national identity. In this article I want to begin to clear up some of the misunderstandings I think have crept into this critical dispute and suggest fruitful ways in which opposing critics can come together in if not harmony then perhaps a less acrimonious, more productive way.

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[Posted 13.xii.2015]

Andrea Selleri’s article ‘Oscar Wilde and Authorialism’, first published in Auothorship in 2014, has now been posted on the ACADEMIA website.

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[Posted 11.xii.2015]

We are pleased to announce the publication of Marc-André Raffalovich’s Uranism and Unisexuality: A Study of Different Manifestations of the Sexual Instinct, translated by Nancy Erber and William A. Peniston, edited by Philip Healy with Frederick S. Roden (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016):

http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/MarcAndr-Raffalovichs-Uranism-and-Unisexuality/?sf1=barcode&st1=9781137451385

Originally published in 1896, Marc-André Raffalovich’s Uranism and Unisexuality is a unique work of early sexology written in French by a gentleman scholar, poet, self-styled scientist of sexuality, and Catholic convert. Never before translated into English, this landmark study argues for the rights of homosexuals in society and its responsibility to them. Raffalovich draws on history, literature, philosophy, and theology to assert that not only is homosexual orientation morally neutral, it can in fact serve an ethical good.

 Raffalovich, an acquaintance of Oscar Wilde who famously rescued John (“Dorian”) Gray when the writer tired of him, was himself a homosexual who bravely transformed his voice to speak publicly at a time when same-sex sexual acts were criminal. He corresponded with all the major specialists of his day and published in scientific venues. This edition provides an introduction, biographical note, and contextualizations for Raffalovich’s many references.

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[Posted 05.xii.2015]

I am pleased to announce that on 1st December, Cambridge Scholars published my Oscar Wilde’s Elegant Republic: Transformation, Dislocation and Fantasy in fin-de-siècle Paris. This work examines the life of Paris as a place of noise, exile and cunning, using Oscar Wilde as stalking horse and with a large and colourful supporting cast.

Why was Paris so popular as a place both of innovation and of exile in the late nineteenth century? Intended as the first volume of a trilogy, using French, English and American sources, this book attempts to provide a possible answer with a detailed exploration of both the city and its communities, who form a varied cast of colourful characters from duchesses to telephonists, artists to beggars, dancers to diplomats crowd the stage. Through the throng moves Oscar Wilde as the connecting thread: Wilde exploratory, Wilde triumphant, Wilde ruined.   Thus we gain both a history of Paris and a view of how Wilde assimilated himself there.

By interweaving fictional representations of Paris and Parisians with historical narrative, Paris of the imagination is blended with the topography of the city described by Victor Hugo as ‘this great phantom composed of darkness and light’.

Written to scholarly standards, it is couched in language accessible to all who wish to explore Paris on foot or from an armchair. This is an original treatment of the belle époque.

LINK

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Preface ………………………………………………………………………vii
Chapter One : Paris Sighted ………………………………………………1
Chapter Two : Paris Mutuels……………………………………………..30
Chapter Three : Anglomania, Francophilia and Anglophobia ……47
Chapter Four : Amis & Faux Amis in a Culture of Easy Duplicity ..62
Chapter Five : Converse ………………………………………………….77
Chapter Six : The Theatre of Paris………………………………………99
Chapter Seven : Café au Fait ……………………………………………132
Chapter Eight : Pervading Paris ……………………………………….152
Chapter Nine : Walking with an Air …………………………………..191
Chapter Ten : Masquerade
–Part 1: Masks and Veils ……………………………………………….213
–Part 2: The Dancer and the Dance ………………………………….221
–Part 3: ‘C’est “shokin’” ça?’ ………………………………………..226
Chapter Eleven : The Artist as Crisis
–Part 1: Vision ……………………………………………………………236
–Part 2: Supervision …………………………………………………….254
Chapter Twelve : Paris and the Good American……………………..260
Chapter Thirteen : A Question of Gender
–Part 1: Paris is a Lady …………………………………………………..307
–Part 2: Paris Lesbos …………………………………………………….328
–Part 3: A Woman’s Place ………………………………………………333
Chapter Fourteen : Phases of the Moon
–Part 1: Gitanes …………………………………………………………..342
–Part 2: A Severed Head ………………………………………………..346
–Part 3: Herodians ……………………………………………………….348
–Part 4: Oscar’s Sarah …………………………………………………..351
–Part 5: Sarah’s Oscar …………………………………………………..363
Chapter Fifteen : Paris as Wilderness
–Part 1: Last Acts …………………………………………………………377
–Part 2: Final Call ………………………………………………………..387
Conclusion ………………….………………………………………………421

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[Posted 25.xi.2015]

Sigmund Freud et le Fantôme d’Oscar Wilde by Danielle Morris, Christian Morris
Harmattan Théâtres
LITTÉRATURE PIÈCE DE THÉÂTRE EUROPE

1938: Freud a abandonné Vienne, contraint à l’exil par la montée du nazisme. Dans sa résidence londonienne, il vit ses derniers mois, menant un combat acharné contre son cancer de la mâchoire. Le père de la psychanalyse y reçoit la visite d’un étrange patient qui prétend être le fantôme d’Oscar Wilde, lui-même mort en exil à Paris en 1900, après sa terrible condamnation à deux ans de travaux forcés pour homosexualité. Ces deux géants vont se parler et s’apprivoiser dans une psychanalyse hors du commun, où s’affronte science et spiritualité, rigueur intransigeante et superficialité de haut vol.

Broché ISBN : 978-2-343-06070-5 • octobre 2015 •

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[Posted 23.xi.2015]

Jörg W. Rademacher draws our attention to the new Oscar Wilde Calendar 2016 which is in the making and concentrates on the aphorisms from the Preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray and related matters. He is  happy to receive orders at the price of 10 € a copy plus postage and packaging. 5 € a copy will be donated to the refugee aid in his area.

Dr. Jörg W. Rademacher <joe-rademacher@t-online.de>

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[Posted 04.xi.2015]

Marie Lecrivain: Rubicon: Words and Art Inspired by Oscar Wilde’s De Profundis.  Sybaritic Press 2015; Ruth Robbins: ‘Always Leave Them Wanting More: Oscar Wilde’s Salome and the Failed Circulations of Desire’ in Jane Ford, Kim Edwards Keates and Patricia Pulham (edd.): Economies of Desire at the Victorian Fin de Siècle.  Routledge; Eleanor Fitzsimons: Wilde’s Women. Duckworth.

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[Posted 03.xi.2015]

We are very pleased to announce that a translation of The Picture of Dorian Gray has been made into Breton.  The translator is Alain Martel, and the publisher An Alarc’h.

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[Posted 23.ix.2015]

Christie Cognevich: ‘Ghostly Markings: Aesthetic Criminality, Acts, and Supernatural Identity in Wilde’s The Canterville Ghost’. Supernatural Studies Autumn 2015.

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[Posted 17.ix.2015]

Joseph Donohue: ‘Wilde in France;  The “Salomé” typescript, Sarah Bernhardt and the production that never was.’  The TLS 11th September 2015 pp.14-15.

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[Posted 14.ix.2015]

Michael Seeney: From Bow Street to the Ritz: Oscar Wilde’s Theatrical Career from 1895 to 1908.  High Wycombe: Rivendale Press 2015.

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[Posted 16.vii.2015]

David Cregan: ‘Reclaiming the Body and the Spirit in Oscar Wilde’s Salomé.’  Studi irlandesi. A Journal of Irish Studies 5 2015 pp.145-156.  http://www.fupress.net/index.php/bsfm-sijis/article/view/16341.

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[Posted 10.vi.2015]

An Ideal Husband
[French version by Jean-Michel Déprats as ‘Un mari idéal’]

Alain Jumeau (editor)
Paris: Gallimard March 2015.

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[Posted 29.v.2015]

Devon Cox: The Street of Wonderful Possibilities: Whistler, Wilde & Sargent in Tite Street.  London: Frances Lincoln Publishers Ltd.June 2015. ISBN: 9780711236738

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 [[Posted 19.v.2015]

Andrea Selleri (University of Warwick, English and Comparative Literary Studies) has uploaded two papers on Academia.edu:

Flaubert, Wilde, Joyce and the Question of the Author; and
Oscar Wilde and Edward Dowden

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 [Posted 21.iv.2015]

Oscar Wilde e Jack London in una Londra affamata is a play by Oscar Bonamici, just published but currently only available in a Kindle edition from Amazon.

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[Posted 30.iii.2015]

Oscar Wilde: Quotable Wilde.  Chichester: Summersdale 2015.

— Yet another anthology of epigrams, but unlike most of its kind, the quotations are sourced.

Oscar Wilde: Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime.  London: Penguin 2015.

— No.59 in the redesigned Penguin Classics series.

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[Posted 03.iii.2015]

The latest issue of Victorian Literature and Culture / Volume 43 / Issue 01 / March 2015 contains (pp.113-130) the research article

Twilight of The Idylls: Wilde, Tennyson, and Fin-De-Siècle Anti-Idealism

Elizabeth Carolyn Miller

University of California, Davis

Abstract

In the climactic finale to the first act of Oscar Wilde’s 1895 play An Ideal Husband, Gertrude Chiltern convinces her husband, a Member of Parliament, not to support the construction of a boondoggle Argentinean canal. Gertrude, not her husband, is the ostensibly moral character here, since the canal’s only purpose is to create wealth for its stockholders, but the language she uses in this impassioned speech quotes Guinevere, the contrite fallen wife in Alfred Tennyson’s Idylls of the King. Near the end of the Idylls, recognizing that her infidelity has occasioned war, turmoil, and the end of Arthur’s reign, Guinevere laments:

Ah my God,

What might I not have made of thy fair world,
Had I but loved thy highest creature here?
It was my duty to have loved the highest:
It surely was my profit had I known:
It would have been my pleasure had I seen.
We needs must love the highest when we see it (G 649–56)

Repeating these words and ideas under drastically different circumstances, Lady Chiltern tells her husband in the finale to Wilde’s first act: “I don’t think you realise sufficiently, Robert, that you have brought into the political life of our time a nobler atmosphere, a finer attitude towards life, a freer air of purer aims and higher ideals – I know it, and for that I love you, Robert. . . . I will love you always, because you will always be worthy of love. We needs must love the highest when we see it!” (Ideal 69).

There are also two pertinent review articles:

Oscar the Opera and the High-Pitched Life’ by Gail Turley Houston

‘Conversations with Oscar Wilde’ by Ann C. Colley

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 [Posted 22.i.2015]

We are pleased to announce the publication of

The Wildean 46 January 2015
This contains the following articles –
Ian Small: ‘Some Studies in Prose’: The Beginnings of Wilde’s Career in Fiction’ pp. 2-20
Laurence Wrenne: Oscar the Addict? Part 1: An Occupation of Some Kind? pp.21-52
Maho Hidaka: Portraits of the Human Body: Japanese Adaptations of Oscar Wilde by Junchiro Tanizaki pp.72-87
James Horrox: The Artist as Critic: [Gustav] Landauer on Wilde pp.53-71
Donald Mead:  Heading for Disaster: Oscar’s Finances, Chapter Five: Bankruptcy pp.88-103
Roger Grant: Speranza’s Visit to Scotland, Summer 1847 pp.104-117
Peter Rowland: Advising Mrs Parks pp.118-29
Stephen Bertman: Platonic Inversion in The Picture of Dorian Gray pp.130-1
For a complete list of articles published in The Wildean, with a note on submissions, please click here.

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[Posted 15.i.2015]

We are pleased to announce the publication of

Ashley H Robins and Merlin Holland: ‘The enigmatic illness and death of Constance, wife of Oscar Wilde.’ The Lancet, Volume 385, No. 9962, pp.21–22, 3rd January 2015.  Full text here.

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[Posted 14.i.2015]

We are pleased to announce the publication of

Antony Edmonds: Oscar Wilde’s Scandalous Summer, The 1894 Worthing Holiday and the Aftermath.

Amberley Publishing 234 x 156 mm | Hardback | 256 pages | 40 illustrations | July 2014.

For a synopsis and an order form, please click here.

Edmonds

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[Posted 07.i.2015]

We are pleased to announce the publication of

Peter Stoneley: ‘”Looking at the Others”: Oscar Wilde and the Reading Gaol Archive’.  Journal of Victorian Culture 2014.  Online version

Abstract

In looking at Wilde and the prison, scholarship has understandably focussed on the lengthy and complex De Profundis, and how the prison experience confirmed or re-shaped Wilde as a writer and thinker. Wilde himself claimed to have been saved by the ‘others’ that he encountered in prison, and these ‘others’ have received scant attention. Who were they? How does a greater knowledge of them supplement our sense of the nineteenth-century prison and of Wilde? This essay looks closely at the Reading Gaol archive, tracing out the lives of some of those with whom Wilde was incarcerated and providing analyses of the prison population in Reading while Wilde was there. Aside from yielding the only known photographs of any of the young working-class men in whom Wilde took an interest, the essay seeks to build a more nuanced reading of Wilde’s experience. Above all, the aim is to open out the meanings of the Wilde myth, and, in particular, to offer a more socially inclusive version.

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